The Ship Report is All Things Maritime!

Ship Report podcasts take you to a special corner of the world: the Mighty Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest. Nautical lore, news and info, mariner interviews, daily international ship traffic, and the inside scoop on our formidable marine weather. Join maritime journalist Joanne Rideout on the Ship Report, as we explore the fascinating nautical world, on the Upper Left Edge of Oregon and beyond.  The Ship Report is proud to celebrate 16 years on the air!

IMO 2020- Part 4 – Under new pollution rules ships will burn cleaner fuel

In Part 3 of our series on the new international air pollution regulations - IMO 2020 - that will start Jan. 1, retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Robert Johnson talks about enforcement (turns out polluting fuel has a signature), the kinds of new fuel ships will carry,...

IMO 2020 – Part 3 on ship air pollution and new regs

Today we talk about health risks worldwide caused by ship air pollution, and how new regulations will drastically cut deaths from lunch cancer, and illnesses such as asthma. Capt. Robert Johnson talks about harmful ship emissions. He's a retired Columbia River Bar...

IMO 2020 – Part 2

The second segment in our series on IMO 2020, new rules that will kick in on January 1, which will enact sweeping changes to the fuel ships use. We hear from retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Robert Johnson, a master mariner who spent his career on ships as a...

IMO 2020 – Part 1 – big changes coming to ship air pollution rules

Today we hear Part 1 in a series on IMO 2020, which refers to the new rules set to take effect on January 1, that will mandate steep cuts in ship emissions. We'll hear from retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Robert Johnson about why ship air pollution is a...

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald

Forty- four years ago this month, the ore carrier Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a horrific storm on Lake Superior on Nov. 10. Her crew of 29 men perished just 15 miles from shore. These lost mariners were locals, and everyone knew their ship, the Mighty Fitz, as she was...

Columbia River Ship Traffic

Approximate Vessel Travel Times

(Times vary according to tidal conditions, current, weather, and individual vessel horsepower)

  • Portland/Vancouver -Astoria: 6-8 hours
  • Kalama -Astoria: 5 hours
  • Longview -Astoria: 3.5 hours
  • Columbia River Bar – Astoria: 1.5 hours

Water Speed & Currents

Curated Links

Tides

When’s High Tide where you are?  Find Tidal info at www.saltwatertides.com

Tide times are often listed in 24 hour time.  For times after noon, subtract 1200 from the time to get regular clock time. Ex: 1300 hrs – 1200 = 1:00 pm)

MLLW:  Also, tides are referenced to Mean Lower Low Water, a reference point for depth on many nautical charts. MLLW is the average of the lower of the two low tides in a day, over a 19-year cycle. Minus tides are lower than MLLW.

Adjustments: If you’re right on the coast, subtract an hour from these times. Upriver, highs and lows happen later. For instance, in Knappa, add an hour. In Clatskanie, add 2 hours and 15 minutes.

The Ship Report

Ship Report Podcasts

IMO 2020- Part 4 – Under new pollution rules ships will burn cleaner fuel

In Part 3 of our series on the new international air pollution regulations - IMO 2020 - that will start Jan. 1, retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Robert Johnson talks about enforcement (turns out polluting fuel has a signature), the kinds of new fuel ships will carry,...

IMO 2020 – Part 3 on ship air pollution and new regs

Today we talk about health risks worldwide caused by ship air pollution, and how new regulations will drastically cut deaths from lunch cancer, and illnesses such as asthma. Capt. Robert Johnson talks about harmful ship emissions. He's a retired Columbia River Bar...

IMO 2020 – Part 2

The second segment in our series on IMO 2020, new rules that will kick in on January 1, which will enact sweeping changes to the fuel ships use. We hear from retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Robert Johnson, a master mariner who spent his career on ships as a...

IMO 2020 – Part 1 – big changes coming to ship air pollution rules

Today we hear Part 1 in a series on IMO 2020, which refers to the new rules set to take effect on January 1, that will mandate steep cuts in ship emissions. We'll hear from retired Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Robert Johnson about why ship air pollution is a...

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald

Forty- four years ago this month, the ore carrier Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a horrific storm on Lake Superior on Nov. 10. Her crew of 29 men perished just 15 miles from shore. These lost mariners were locals, and everyone knew their ship, the Mighty Fitz, as she was...
10-Minute Ship Reports: Monday through Thursday, featuring  Daily Ship Traffic, Marine Weather, News and Interviews

Ship Report Minutes:  On Fridays, where we answer listener questions. Short and sweet!

The Ship Report is also broadcast Weekdays at 8:49 am on Coast Community Radio Astoria, Oregon

coastradio.org

Columbia River Bar

“Pilot transfer” is when a pilot disembarks or boards a ship. Ships generally must by law have a river or bar pilot on board when they are on the Columbia or Willamette Rivers. The bar and river pilots have separate pilotage grounds defined by the Oregon Legislature.

Ship's Store

FEATURED:

The Columbia River Ship Report
Quick Guide to Shipwatching

Fisher Poet’s Gathering CD

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Meet Joanne Rideout

Producer Joanne Rideout is a journalist and photographer who created The Ship Report in 2003. Since then Joanne and has been interviewing, writing and photographing the maritime world and its interesting people as much as she possibly can.

Ship Horn Signals

Commonly Heard off Astoria

One prolonged blast every two minutes or less: vessel operating in fog.

Five consecutive horn blasts: warning signal that means literally “I do not know your intention.” This generally means another vessel is in the way of a ship in the channel, and is being asked to move before they collide.

Three short blasts: Vessel going in reverse

One long blast followed by three short: signal for the change of pilots. Soon after this signal, you’ll see the pilot launch Arrow II head out to a passing ship, to facilitate the transfer of bar and river pilots.