The Ship Report is All Things Maritime!

Ship Report podcasts take you to a special corner of the world: the Mighty Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest. Nautical lore, news and info, mariner interviews, daily international ship traffic, and the inside scoop on our formidable marine weather. Join maritime journalist Joanne Rideout on the Ship Report, as we explore the fascinating nautical world, on the Upper Left Edge of Oregon and beyond.  The Ship Report is proud to celebrate 16 years on the air!

More about anchoring ships

More from Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Thron Riggs, about why ships use the port anchor when they anchor here on the river.

More help for Coast Guard families

More ways to help Coast Guard families affected by the shutdown

Captain Thron Riggs on Anchoring

Today on the Ship Report, a real treat: Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Thron Riggs answers a listener question about anchoring ships. Captain Riggs was instrumental in helping the Ship Report get off the ground as a radio show 16 years ago. Many thanks to him for all...

Accidental search and rescue

Today we're talking about a recent Coast Guard request asking boatowners and other mariners to take care to secure their watercraft from going adrift in bad weather. Many accidental search and rescue missions have been launched because someone's kayak, for example,...

USCG Polar Star icebreaker completes Antarctic annual mission

The USCG icebreaker Polar Star accomplished her annual mission to Antarctica this week, breaking a channel through 21 ft thick sea ice to allow a supply ship to reach McMurdo Station at the bottom of the world.

Columbia River Ship Traffic

Approximate Vessel Travel Times

(Times vary according to tidal conditions, current, weather, and individual vessel horsepower)

  • Portland/Vancouver -Astoria: 6-8 hours
  • Kalama -Astoria: 5 hours
  • Longview -Astoria: 3.5 hours
  • Columbia River Bar – Astoria: 1.5 hours

Water Speed & Currents

Curated Links

Tides

When’s High Tide where you are?  Find Tidal info at www.saltwatertides.com

Tide times are often listed in 24 hour time.  For times after noon, subtract 1200 from the time to get regular clock time. Ex: 1300 hrs – 1200 = 1:00 pm)

MLLW:  Also, tides are referenced to Mean Lower Low Water, a reference point for depth on many nautical charts. MLLW is the average of the lower of the two low tides in a day, over a 19-year cycle. Minus tides are lower than MLLW.

Adjustments: If you’re right on the coast, subtract an hour from these times. Upriver, highs and lows happen later. For instance, in Knappa, add an hour. In Clatskanie, add 2 hours and 15 minutes.

The Ship Report

Ship Report Podcasts

More about anchoring ships

More from Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Thron Riggs, about why ships use the port anchor when they anchor here on the river.

More help for Coast Guard families

More ways to help Coast Guard families affected by the shutdown

Captain Thron Riggs on Anchoring

Today on the Ship Report, a real treat: Columbia River Bar Pilot Capt. Thron Riggs answers a listener question about anchoring ships. Captain Riggs was instrumental in helping the Ship Report get off the ground as a radio show 16 years ago. Many thanks to him for all...

Accidental search and rescue

Today we're talking about a recent Coast Guard request asking boatowners and other mariners to take care to secure their watercraft from going adrift in bad weather. Many accidental search and rescue missions have been launched because someone's kayak, for example,...

USCG Polar Star icebreaker completes Antarctic annual mission

The USCG icebreaker Polar Star accomplished her annual mission to Antarctica this week, breaking a channel through 21 ft thick sea ice to allow a supply ship to reach McMurdo Station at the bottom of the world.
10-Minute Ship Reports: Monday through Thursday, featuring  Daily Ship Traffic, Marine Weather, News and Interviews

Ship Report Minutes:  On Fridays, where we answer listener questions. Short and sweet!

The Ship Report is also broadcast Weekdays at 8:49 am on Coast Community Radio Astoria, Oregon

coastradio.org

Columbia River Bar

“Pilot transfer” is when a pilot disembarks or boards a ship. Ships generally must by law have a river or bar pilot on board when they are on the Columbia or Willamette Rivers. The bar and river pilots have separate pilotage grounds defined by the Oregon Legislature.

Ship's Store

FEATURED:

The Columbia River Ship Report
Quick Guide to Shipwatching

Fisher Poet’s Gathering CD

Follow The Ship Report

Meet Joanne Rideout

Producer Joanne Rideout is a journalist and photographer who created The Ship Report in 2003. Since then Joanne and has been interviewing, writing and photographing the maritime world and its interesting people as much as she possibly can.

Ship Horn Signals

Commonly Heard off Astoria

One prolonged blast every two minutes or less: vessel operating in fog.

Five consecutive horn blasts: warning signal that means literally “I do not know your intention.” This generally means another vessel is in the way of a ship in the channel, and is being asked to move before they collide.

Three short blasts: Vessel going in reverse

One long blast followed by three short: signal for the change of pilots. Soon after this signal, you’ll see the pilot launch Arrow II head out to a passing ship, to facilitate the transfer of bar and river pilots.