King tides, atmospheric river, sneaker waves, oh my!

King tides, atmospheric river, sneaker waves, oh my!

Today’s weather and tides are wreaking havoc in coastal Oregon and Washington today as an atmopsheric river dumps up to 10 inches of rain in our area. We’ll talk about what ships do when the weather gets awful, and what to expect if you’re on land.

New Year’s Eve Ship Horns on the Columbia

New Year’s Eve Ship Horns on the Columbia

Astoria embraced a long standing tradition again this New Year’s Eve, ushering in the new year in maritime style on the Columbia River. ‘Round midnight, an ethereal mix of sonorous ship horns, spontaneous fireworks and midnight revelers in the streets filled the air, transforming a typically rainy Pacific Northwest winter night into something special to be remembered.

Note: if you want to skip ahead to hear the New Year’s ship horns segment, listen in at about [2:49] in the recording.

Situational awareness – an essential quality for mariners

Situational awareness – an essential quality for mariners

Today’s show is about situational awareness, the skill of paying attention to what’s happening around you even when your tendency might be to daydream. It’s a factor in maritime accidents, and avoiding them, and is just part of the challenging work that mariners do. We’ll talk about how maritime accidents can happen. And how mariners think ahead to avoid problems, in a work environment where tremendous forces are at play.

The 114th anniversary of the wreck of the Peter Iredale

The 114th anniversary of the wreck of the Peter Iredale

Yesterday marked the 114th anniversary of the wreck of the sailing cargo ship Peter Iredale, which ran ashore in foggy conditions on the ocean beach at Clatsop Spit on October 25, 1906. Parts of her steel frame remain on the beach as a reminder of the hazards of operating ships in the Graveyard of the Pacific. Today we remember the Iredale in the words and music, fromĀ  local historian Frank Lehn, and local band the Brownsmead Flats.

Photo courtesy of historian Frank Lehn and the Long Peninsula Friends of Facebook.