Could another port take over container service here on the Columbia? Unlikely.

Apr 17, 2024

Today we’ll talk about a listener comment regarding the Port of Portland’s decision to suspend container service this fall out of its Terminal 6 facilities. A person suggested that containers be shipped out of Astoria instead. We’ll talk about why that is highly unlikely, at Astoria or most other ports on the river. Mostly, it’s a matter of highly expensive infrastructure. But also, equipment costs are huge.

Could another port take over container service here on the Columbia? Unlikely.

Could another port take over container service here on the Columbia? Unlikely.

Today we’ll talk about a listener comment regarding the Port of Portland’s decision to suspend container service this fall out of its Terminal 6 facilities. A person suggested that containers be shipped out of Astoria instead. We’ll talk about why that is highly unlikely, at Astoria or most other ports on the river. Mostly, it’s a matter of highly expensive infrastructure. But also, equipment costs are huge.

Port of Portland announces end of containership service to Terminal 6

Apr 16, 2024

The big maritime news locally this week is the announcement by the Port of Portland that they will end container ship service to the Port’s Terminal 6 as of October 1. The decision will mean the Columbia River will no longer have container service, since Portland is the only port with the infrastructure and equipment to handle containers. Carships and bulk carriers will continue to call on the Port.

Portland has gained and lost container service over the past two decades. The most recent round of container service began during the pandemic, when the Port of Portland served as a overflow port for overcrowded ports on the West Coast. The service has continued with several container ships per week transiting the river.

According to this week’s news reports, that service will cease at the end of September. The hope is that this will only be temporary.

Photo: Port of Portland’s Terminal 6 container cranes. Credit: M.O. Stevens, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Could another port take over container service here on the Columbia? Unlikely.

Port of Portland announces end of containership service to Terminal 6

The big maritime news locally this week is the announcement by the Port of Portland that they will end container ship service to the Port’s Terminal 6 as of October 1. The decision will mean the Columbia River will no longer have container service, since Portland is the only port with the infrastructure and equipment to handle containers. Carships and bulk carriers will continue to call on the Port.

Portland has gained and lost container service over the past two decades. The most recent round of container service began during the pandemic, when the Port of Portland served as a overflow port for overcrowded ports on the West Coast. The service has continued with several container ships per week transiting the river.

According to this week’s news reports, that service will cease at the end of September. The hope is that this will only be temporary.

Photo: Port of Portland’s Terminal 6 container cranes. Credit: M.O. Stevens, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

The expensive law of “general average” and how it applies to cargo ship disasters

Apr 15, 2024

There’s an ancient tenet of maritime law that is cropping up in reports about the catastrophe in Baltimore harbor with the containership Dali. It’s called “general average,” and it has to do with who pays when a ship runs into expensive trouble during a voyage.

This law can force those customers whose cargo is on the ship to help pay for the cost of the disaster. Mostly it ends up being a complex negotiation between many insurance companies, but it could be an expensive caveat for small businesses who may not have insured their cargo sufficiently.

The expensive law of “general average” and how it applies to cargo ship disasters

The expensive law of “general average” and how it applies to cargo ship disasters

There’s an ancient tenet of maritime law that is cropping up in reports about the catastrophe in Baltimore harbor with the containership Dali. It’s called “general average,” and it has to do with who pays when a ship runs into expensive trouble during a voyage.

This law can force those customers whose cargo is on the ship to help pay for the cost of the disaster. Mostly it ends up being a complex negotiation between many insurance companies, but it could be an expensive caveat for small businesses who may not have insured their cargo sufficiently.

The close of our series on USCG rescue swimmers

Apr 12, 2024

This week we’ve heard a series from the Ship Report archives on USCG rescue swimmers. Today ends that series.

The close of our series on USCG rescue swimmers

The close of our series on USCG rescue swimmers

This week we’ve heard a series from the Ship Report archives on USCG rescue swimmers. Today ends that series.

More about Coast Guard rescue swimmers

Apr 11, 2024

We’re hearing a weeklong series about USCG rescue swimmers this week. Today is part 4.

The close of our series on USCG rescue swimmers

More about Coast Guard rescue swimmers

We’re hearing a weeklong series about USCG rescue swimmers this week. Today is part 4.

Rescue Swimmer series continued

Apr 10, 2024

We’re hearing excerpts this week from an interview I did with a USCG rescue swimmer based at Air Station Astoria.

The close of our series on USCG rescue swimmers

Rescue Swimmer series continued

We’re hearing excerpts this week from an interview I did with a USCG rescue swimmer based at Air Station Astoria.