Tugboats and their crews: unsung heroes in the pandemic

Tugboats and their crews: unsung heroes in the pandemic

Today on the Ship Report, we’re talking about tugboats in the pandemic, and how their tireless work and willingness to flex with market conditions have made tugs and their crews a critical part of the supply chain during COVID-19.

Note to listeners: I forgot to record The Ship Report this morning when I was on the air on KMUN (I think I have pandemic brain to a degree and sometimes things just slip my mind when I don’t want them to…). But to honor my declaration that I was truly back to posting daily podcasts of the show, I re-did the Report later and recorded it. Because of that, I didn’t have to stick to the usual 9 minute constraints of the Ship Report on the radio.

So……I went on a bit. 

In this podcast, I was able to do a longer show, and go through the ship schedule in more depth than I usually have time for on the air, with more asides of (I think) interesting info about ships and matters associated with them. I was also able to more deeply discuss the role tugboats have played in getting goods to us during the pandemic. I hope you enjoy the extra info included in this Report, and that it’s worth your time. You might call this one a “geeks only” version.

Much love to all in these uncertain times  –  Joanne

The 114th anniversary of the wreck of the Peter Iredale

The 114th anniversary of the wreck of the Peter Iredale

Yesterday marked the 114th anniversary of the wreck of the sailing cargo ship Peter Iredale, which ran ashore in foggy conditions on the ocean beach at Clatsop Spit on October 25, 1906. Parts of her steel frame remain on the beach as a reminder of the hazards of operating ships in the Graveyard of the Pacific. Today we remember the Iredale in the words and music, from  local historian Frank Lehn, and local band the Brownsmead Flats.

Photo courtesy of historian Frank Lehn and the Long Peninsula Friends of Facebook.

Harrowing beach rescue equipment from bygone days

Harrowing beach rescue equipment from bygone days

Before we had the modern ships, planes and helicopters the USCG uses now to rescue people in trouble at sea, we had the US Lifesaving Service, which operated locally here on the Long Beach Peninsula and other area beaches. Today we take a look at the equipment they used then to save lives. Some options presented almost as frightening a prospect as a wreck itself.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons, public domain. Source: Library of Congress, 1919.

Waterfront reflections on the river we love

Waterfront reflections on the river we love

Most of us who live near the river seldom venture out on it. But we love it all the same. Today we hear from a chef at a popular waterfront restaurant and brewery in Astoria, about how his kinship with the river, and his closeness to it, sustains him through challenging times.